round


round
around, round
1. In general, BrE prefers round and AmE prefers around, both as an adverb and as a preposition, except in certain more or less fixed expressions or restricted collocations. In BrE it is usual to say all the year round, Winter comes round, The wheels go round, Send the book round, Show me round, whereas in all these cases AmE would normally use around.
2. Around is obligatory in fixed expressions such as fool around, mess around, sit around, etc, all around (as in All around there are signs of decay), and to have been around. In some of these, about is also possible, but not round.
3. BrE still tends to prefer about as a preposition meaning ‘approximately’, although around is also used (e.g. There are about/around 100 in all / Come about/around 4 o'clock), whereas AmE generally prefers around. See about.
4. However, the distribution of around and round is subject to considerable variation in practice, as the following examples show: (around as preposition)

• Jesse…moped around the house all day —Lee Smith, AmE 1983

• The area around Waterloo —R. Elms, BrE 1988

• They stood grouped around their luggage —M. Bracewell, BrE 1989

• (round as preposition)

• A map rolled up round a broom handle —Jeanette Winterson, BrE 1985

• He looked round the table as if daring anyone to smile —David Lodge, 1988

• (around as adverb) Stay around till she gets back —New Yorker, AmE 1989

• Hartmann's sunny…attitude was marvellous to have around —Anita Brookner, BrE 1988

• The devices have been around a while —USA Today, AmE 1988

• I went around to the front door —New Yorker, AmE 1989

• (round as adverb) In the end she talked me round —Nina Bawden, BrE 1987

• The news had gotten round pretty fast —New Yorker, AmE 1998.


Modern English usage. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Round — Round, a. [OF. roond, roont, reond, F. rond, fr. L. rotundus, fr. rota wheel. See {Rotary}, and cf. {Rotund}, {roundel}, {Rundlet}.] 1. Having every portion of the surface or of the circumference equally distant from the center; spherical;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • round — round1 [round] adj. [ME < OFr roont < L rotundus: see ROTUND] 1. shaped like a ball; spherical; globular 2. a) shaped like a circle, ring, or disk; circular b) shaped like a cylinder (in having a circular cross section); cylindrical 3 …   English World dictionary

  • Round — (round), n. 1. Anything round, as a circle, a globe, a ring. The golden round [the crown]. Shak. [1913 Webster] In labyrinth of many a round self rolled. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A series of changes or events ending where it began; a series of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • round — ► ADJECTIVE 1) shaped like a circle or cylinder. 2) shaped like a sphere. 3) having a curved surface with no sharp projections. 4) (of a person s shoulders) bent forward. 5) (of a voice or musical tone) rich and mellow. 6) (of a number) expressed …   English terms dictionary

  • round — [ raund; rund ] n. m. • 1850; mot angl. « cercle, cycle, tour » ♦ Reprise (d un combat de boxe). Combat en dix rounds. « Au coup de gong annonçant le commencement du premier round » (Hémon). ♢ Fig. Épisode d une négociation difficile, d un combat …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Round — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Dorothy Round (1908–1982), englische Tennisspielerin Henry Joseph Round (1881–1966), englischer Forscher; gilt als Erfinder der Leuchtdiode Siehe auch: Round Dance Round Effekt Round Hill Round Island… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Round — Round, adv. 1. On all sides; around. [1913 Webster] Round he throws his baleful eyes. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Circularly; in a circular form or manner; by revolving or reversing one s position; as, to turn one s head round; a wheel turns round …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Round — Round, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rounding}.] 1. To make circular, spherical, or cylindrical; to give a round or convex figure to; as, to round a silver coin; to round the edges of anything. [1913 Webster] Worms with many… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • round — [adj1] ball shaped; semicircular area annular, arced, arched, arciform, bent, bowed, bulbous, circular, coiled, curled, curved, curvilinear, cylindrical, discoid, disk shaped, domical, egg shaped, elliptical, globose, globular, looped, orbed,… …   New thesaurus

  • Round — Round, prep. On every side of, so as to encompass or encircle; around; about; as, the people atood round him; to go round the city; to wind a cable round a windlass. [1913 Webster] The serpent Error twines round human hearts. Cowper. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Round — or rounds can mean:* The shape of a circle or sphere * Rounding (sediment), the smoothness of a sediment particle * Roundedness, the roundedness of the lips in the pronunciation of a phoneme * Rounding, the truncation of a number to reduce the… …   Wikipedia